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About MS - Betaseron

This page contains links to eMedTV Multiple Sclerosis Articles containing information on subjects from About MS to Betaseron. The information is organized alphabetically; the "Favorite Articles" contains the top articles on this page. Links in the box will take you directly to the articles; those same links are available with a short description further down the page.
Favorite Articles
Descriptions of Articles
  • About MS
    Learning about MS and how it affects the body is helpful in better understanding this unpredictable disease. This page of the eMedTV archives contains information on MS and explains how it leads to problems with muscle control and vision.
  • Aktuella behandlingar för multipel skleros
    Det finns inget känt botemedel för multipel skleros men det finns många typer av behandlingar.
  • Ampira
    If you have multiple sclerosis and have trouble walking, your doctor may prescribe Ampyra. This eMedTV resource further explores this medicine, including information on its possible benefits and side effects. Ampira is a common misspelling of Ampyra.
  • Ampyra
    The prescription drug Ampyra is used as a treatment for multiple sclerosis (MS). This eMedTV Web page explores how this medicine can help improve walking in people with MS, explains when and how to take it, and lists some of its potential side effects.
  • Ampyra and Breastfeeding
    Women are generally advised to avoid breastfeeding while using Ampyra (dalfampridine). This eMedTV Web page explains whether the medication passes through breast milk and discusses the manufacturer's recommendation on the topic.
  • Ampyra and Pregnancy
    Based on the results of animal studies, it may not be safe to take Ampyra (dalfampridine) during pregnancy. This eMedTV page describes the problems that occurred when the drug was given to pregnant animals and explains what to discuss with your doctor.
  • Ampyra Dosage
    As this eMedTV page explains, there is only one standard dose of Ampyra -- 10 mg taken twice a day. This page takes a closer look at dosing guidelines for this multiple sclerosis drug, including tips for when and how to take it most effectively.
  • Ampyra Drug Interactions
    It is unlikely that Ampyra will negatively interact with other medications. However, this eMedTV page explains the situations in which the possibility of drug interactions may become significant and explains what to discuss with your doctor.
  • Ampyra Medication Information
    Ampyra is a multiple sclerosis drug that can help improve walking in people with this condition. This eMedTV Web article provides important information on the medication, including Ampyra's possible side effects and general safety precautions.
  • Ampyra Overdose
    As this eMedTV segment explains, an overdose of Ampyra (dalfampridine) requires medical care and can cause problems such as seizures, speech changes, and weakness. This article takes a closer look at what could happen when people take too much Ampyra.
  • Ampyra Side Effects
    Potential side effects of Ampyra include headaches, dizziness, and insomnia. This eMedTV Web article lists other possible side effects, including common problems and potentially serious problems that may require immediate medical attention.
  • Ampyra Uses
    Ampyra is a prescription drug that can improve walking in people with multiple sclerosis (MS). This page on the eMedTV site takes a more in-depth look at what Ampyra is used for, including how this medication works and whether it is safe for children.
  • Ampyra Warnings and Precautions
    If you have seizures or kidney problems, talk to your doctor before using Ampyra. This eMedTV segment explains what else to tell your doctor about before taking Ampyra. Warnings and precautions on other potential risks with the drug are also listed.
  • Aubagio
    Aubagio is a prescription drug used to treat certain types of multiple sclerosis. This article from the eMedTV Web library explores this medication in more detail, with information on how it works, possible side effects, and dosing guidelines.
  • Aubagio and Breastfeeding
    It is generally recommended that women not breastfeed while taking Aubagio (teriflunomide). This eMedTV page discusses whether this drug passes through breast milk and describes some of the problems that may occur if Aubagio is used while nursing.
  • Aubagio and Pregnancy
    As discussed in this eMedTV resource, an unborn child may be at risk for dangerous complications if the mother takes Aubagio (teriflunomide) during pregnancy. This page describes the problems that may occur and explains what your doctor may recommend.
  • Aubagio Dosage
    Aubagio tablets are taken once daily to treat multiple sclerosis. This eMedTV resource takes a closer look at how your dosage of Aubagio is taken and how the amount is determined. It also provides tips to help you get the most out of each dosage.
  • Aubagio Drug Interactions
    When Aubagio is used with medicines used to treat cancer or certain other drugs, it may cause interactions. This eMedTV article describes how these and other products may cause side effects or interfere with the effectiveness of the medications.
  • Aubagio Medication Information
    As explained in this eMedTV selection, Aubagio is a drug used to treat certain types of multiple sclerosis in adults. This resource covers other information on this medication, describing how Aubagio is taken, possible side effects, and safety issues.
  • Aubagio Oral Medication
    As this eMedTV article explains, Aubagio is an oral medication prescribed for use in people with certain types of multiple sclerosis. This Web page discusses how to take it, possible side effects, and more.
  • Aubagio Overdose
    This part of the eMedTV archives explains that an overdose on Aubagio (teriflunomide) may cause dangerous reactions. This resource further discusses the specific effects of this type of overdose and describes how these problems may be treated.
  • Aubagio Side Effects
    Hair loss, flu-like symptoms, and skin reactions are among the possible side effects of Aubagio. This eMedTV Web page provides a detailed list of reactions to this prescription medication. It also explains when to seek urgent medical treatment.
  • Aubagio Uses
    As discussed in this eMedTV segment, Aubagio is used for treating the relapsing forms of multiple sclerosis in adults. This page describes how Aubagio works and discusses whether there are off-label (unapproved) uses for the drug.
  • Aubagio Warnings and Precautions
    Nerve damage and life-threatening skin reactions are some of the complications that may occur with Aubagio. This eMedTV segment outlines other warnings and precautions for Aubagio, and offers details on who should not use the multiple sclerosis drug.
  • Avanex
    Avonex is a prescription medicine that is used for treating multiple sclerosis. This article from the eMedTV Web site lists possible side effects of Avonex and explains how the medication works. Avanex is a common misspelling of Avonex.
  • Avinex
    Avonex is a prescription medication licensed to treat multiple sclerosis. This eMedTV page describes how Avonex works, explains how often the drug is injected, and lists possible side effects of the medicine. Avinex is a common misspelling of Avonex.
  • Avonex
    Avonex is a medication that is often prescribed for treating multiple sclerosis. This page from the eMedTV Web site explores how Avonex works, describes the effects of the drug, and explains what you should know before starting treatment.
  • Avonex and Breastfeeding
    At this time, it is not known whether Avonex passes through breast milk. This eMedTV Web page offers more information on Avonex and breastfeeding, and explains why the drug is not likely to cause problems even if it does pass through breast milk.
  • Avonex and Depression
    It is possible to develop depression while taking Avonex. This segment from the eMedTV archives provides more detailed information on Avonex and depression, and offers suggestions on what you should do if depression symptoms develop.
  • Avonex and Hair Loss
    Hair loss is a potential side effect of Avonex. This eMedTV resource provides more information on Avonex and hair loss, including an explanation of how common this side effect appears to be and suggestions on what you can do if hair loss occurs.
  • Avonex and Pregnancy
    Avonex may cause problems when used during pregnancy. As this section of the eMedTV Web site explains, animal studies on Avonex and pregnancy show that the drug increased the risk for side effects when it was given to pregnant monkeys.
  • Avonex Dosage
    There is only one standard Avonex dosage -- 30 mcg injected intramuscularly once a week. This part of the eMedTV library contains other important Avonex dosing information and includes precautions and tips for injecting the medication.
  • Avonex Drug Interactions
    Theophylline and zidovudine may cause negative Avonex drug interactions. This eMedTV resource lists specific theophylline and zidovudine products that may interact negatively with Avonex and describes the possible effects of these interactions.
  • Avonex Injections for MS
    If you have multiple sclerosis (MS), Avonex injections may be recommended as part of your treatment plan. This eMedTV segment describes how this medication works for MS and how it performed in a clinical trial. A link to more information is also provided.
  • Avonex Overdose
    An Avonex overdose is unlikely to occur because each vial or syringe holds only enough Avonex for one dose. This eMedTV article discusses the possible effects of an Avonex overdose and describes the treatment options that are available.
  • Avonex Side Effects
    Weakness, nausea, and headache are some of the most commonly reported side effects of Avonex. This eMedTV article lists other possible reactions seen with this drug, including other common problems and serious side effects that require medical attention.
  • Avonex Uses
    Avonex is used for the treatment of multiple sclerosis in people over the age of 18. This article on the eMedTV site further explores how Avonex works, explains whether it can be used in children, and discusses possible off-label Avonex uses.
  • Avonex Warnings and Precautions
    Before taking Avonex, let your doctor know if you have depression, epilepsy, or any allergies. This eMedTV resource offers other Avonex warnings and precautions, and describes possible side effects or complications that may occur with the drug.
  • Baclafen
    Baclofen is a medication used to treat spasticity caused by MS, spinal cord injuries, or cerebral palsy. This eMedTV Web segment provides some general precautions to be aware of before using this medicine. Baclafen is a common misspelling of baclofen.
  • Baclofan
    Baclofen can help treat spasticity due to MS, spinal cord injuries, or cerebral palsy. This eMedTV Web resource provides a brief overview of this prescription medicine and describes possible side effects. Baclofan is a common misspelling of baclofen.
  • Baclofen
    Baclofen is a prescription medication used for treating spasticity caused by MS or a spinal cord problem. This eMedTV Web resource offers a more in-depth look at this drug, including its effects, dosage guidelines, and general precautions and warnings.
  • Baclofen 10 mg
    If you have spasticity caused by brain or spinal cord damage, your doctor may prescribe baclofen 10 mg. This eMedTV resource outlines dosing guidelines for the various forms of baclofen and offers tips on using this medication safely.
  • Baclofen 20 mg
    A doctor may prescribe baclofen 20 mg to treat spasticity caused by brain and spinal cord damage. This eMedTV page lists the various forms of baclofen and explains which conditions the medication is used to treat. A link to more information is included.
  • Baclofen and Breastfeeding
    In general, using baclofen (Lioresal, Gablofen) while breastfeeding is typically considered safe. This eMedTV Web page further discusses baclofen and breastfeeding, and describes what to watch for in your child if you decide to take it while nursing.
  • Baclofen and Pregnancy
    Baclofen (Lioresal, Gablofen) is a pregnancy Category C drug, meaning it may not be safe during pregnancy. This eMedTV resource offers more information on this important topic, including the possible risks to a fetus when a pregnant woman takes baclofen.
  • Baclofen Dosage
    To minimize side effects, the lowest effective baclofen dosage should be used. This eMedTV segment offers dosing guidelines for the various forms of the medication (oral and intrathecal infusion) and explains when and how to take baclofen.
  • Baclofen Drug Information
    As this eMedTV Web resource explains, baclofen is a prescribed drug used to treat spasticity. This article offers a brief overview of important baclofen drug information, including general precautions and potential side effects of the medicine.
  • Baclofen Drug Interactions
    Alcohol, antidepressants, and antipsychotics are among the drugs that could interact with baclofen. This eMedTV Web page lists other products that can cause drug interactions and describes the potential complications that may occur.
  • Baclofen for Stiff Muscles
    If you have spasticity, or uncontrollably stiff muscles, baclofen (Lioresal, Gablofen) may be beneficial. This eMedTV page explains how this drug can help treat stiff muscles caused by conditions such as multiple sclerosis and cerebral palsy.
  • Baclofen Intrathecal Injection
    As this eMedTV page explains, baclofen intrathecal injection works to treat spasticity by directly pumping the medicine to the spinal cord. This page explains when a doctor may prescribe this form of baclofen and describes several benefits.
  • Baclofen Medication Information
    This eMedTV Web presentation offers information on baclofen, a medication used for treating spasticity caused by conditions such as MS, cerebral palsy, or spinal cord injuries. This page also explains why the drug may not be suitable for some people.
  • Baclofen Oral
    As this eMedTV Web article explains, baclofen oral tablets may be prescribed to treat spasticity caused by several conditions related to brain or spinal cord damage. This page also describes how the medication works and lists possible side effects.
  • Baclofen Overdose
    Seek immediate medical care if you believe you have overdosed on baclofen (Lioresal, Gablofen). This eMedTV Web article provides a list of possible overdose symptoms (such as slow breathing, vomiting, and seizures and describes possible treatment options.
  • Baclofen Pump
    For people with severe spasticity, a baclofen (Lioresal, Gablofen) pump may be used to administer the drug. This eMedTV resource explains how the pump can help people avoid potentially intolerable and dangerous side effects of oral baclofen tablets.
  • Baclofen Side Effects
    If you are taking baclofen, side effects may include drowsiness, dizziness, and nausea. This eMedTV Web segment lists other potential side effects seen with the medication, including serious side effects that may require immediate medical attention.
  • Baclofen Tablets
    As this eMedTV page explains, baclofen tablets may be prescribed to treat spasticity caused by MS or a spinal cord injury. This page offers a brief overview of the drug, including how it works, potential side effects, and available strengths.
  • Baclofen Warnings and Precautions
    This eMedTV article explains that baclofen may not be safe for people who have epilepsy, kidney disease, or a mental illness. This page further discusses precautions and warnings with baclofen, including what to tell your doctor before using it.
  • Baclofen Withdrawal
    Potentially dangerous complications can occur when a person stops taking baclofen (Lioresal, Gablofen). This eMedTV segment describes possible symptoms of baclofen withdrawal and explains what a doctor may recommend to minimize these symptoms.
  • Baclofen Withdrawl
    As this eMedTV page explains, stopping baclofen too quickly may lead to withdrawal symptoms, such as organ failure or loss of life. A link to more information is also included. Baclofen withdrawl is a common misspelling of baclofen withdrawal.
  • Baclofene
    Baclofen, a prescription medicine used to treat spasticity, can help people with MS or cerebral palsy. This eMedTV page provides a brief overview of the drug and offers some general dosing guidelines. Baclofene is a common misspelling of baclofen.
  • Baclofin
    A doctor may prescribe baclofen to treat spasticity caused by MS, spinal cord injuries, or cerebral palsy. This eMedTV page takes a brief look at this medication, including how it works and side effects. Baclofin is a common misspelling of baclofen.
  • Baclophen
    If you have spasticity due to certain conditions, a doctor may prescribe baclofen. This eMedTV article offers a brief description of baclofen and explains what to tell your doctor before taking this medicine. Baclophen is a common misspelling of baclofen.
  • Betaseron
    Betaseron is a prescription medicine that is commonly used for treating multiple sclerosis. This eMedTV segment provides dosing information for the drug, describes its effects, and explains what you should know before starting treatment.
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