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Betaseron and Breastfeeding - How Does BG-12 Work?

This page contains links to eMedTV Multiple Sclerosis Articles containing information on subjects from Betaseron and Breastfeeding to How Does BG-12 Work?. The information is organized alphabetically; the "Favorite Articles" contains the top articles on this page. Links in the box will take you directly to the articles; those same links are available with a short description further down the page.
Favorite Articles
Descriptions of Articles
  • Betaseron and Breastfeeding
    It is recommended that women avoid breastfeeding while taking Betaseron (interferon beta-1b). This part of the eMedTV library offers more information on Betaseron and breastfeeding, and explains whether the drug is likely to pass through breast milk.
  • Betaseron and Depression
    Depression appears to be a potential side effect of Betaseron (interferon beta-1b). This eMedTV resource further explores the link between Betaseron and depression, and explains what your doctor may recommend if you develop any depression symptoms.
  • Betaseron and Pregnancy
    Studies on Betaseron (interferon beta-1b) and pregnancy show the drug may not be safe for pregnant women. This eMedTV segment describes the problems that occurred when Betaseron was given to pregnant animals and explores the risks for pregnant women.
  • Betaseron Dosage
    It is usually recommended to start with a low dose and gradually work up to the full Betaseron dosage. This eMedTV article provides a detailed Betaseron dosing schedule and includes information on where and how to give the injections.
  • Betaseron Drug Interactions
    Certain medications may interact with Betaseron, including zidovudine and theophylline. This eMedTV resource lists specific zidovudine and theophylline products that may cause Betaseron drug interactions and explains the effects of these interactions.
  • Betaseron Injection Information
    As explained in this eMedTV selection, Betaseron is an injected medication used to treat multiple sclerosis (MS). This article takes a quick look at Betaseron, with information on how often the injections are given and what to discuss with your doctor.
  • Betaseron Overdose
    As this eMedTV segment explains, it is not known what to expect from a Betaseron (interferon beta-1b) overdose, other than the usual Betaseron side effects. This article also lists treatment options available for a Betaseron overdose.
  • Betaseron Side Effects
    Insomnia, pain, and headache are some of the most commonly reported side effects of Betaseron. This eMedTV Web page also lists potentially serious side effects that require medical attention, such as chest pain, allergic reactions, or thyroid problems.
  • Betaseron Uses
    Betaseron is used for the treatment of relapsing multiple sclerosis in adults. This article from the eMedTV Web site explains how Betaseron works, describes the effects of the medication, and explores possible off-label Betaseron uses.
  • Betaseron Warnings and Precautions
    Before using Betaseron, tell your doctor if you have epilepsy or depression. This eMedTV page lists other conditions you should tell your doctor about before taking Betaseron. Warnings and precautions on who shouldn't take the drug are also included.
  • BG-12
    Previously known as BG-12, Tecfidera is used to treat relapsing forms of multiple sclerosis. This eMedTV resource takes a look at this prescription medicine, including what it's used for, how to take it, and possible side effects.
  • BG-12 and Biogen
    Made by Biogen Idec, Tecfidera (also known as BG-12) is used to treat multiple sclerosis. This eMedTV article explains what this drug is used for, how to take it, and possible side effects that may occur. It also links to more details.
  • BG-12 for MS
    As discussed in this eMedTV article, Tecfidera (also known as BG-12) is prescribed to treat multiple sclerosis (MS). This resource explains how this drug works to help reduce attacks of MS symptoms and minimize damage to cells.
  • Can You Overdose on Baclofen?
    As this page of the eMedTV library explains, it is possible to overdose on baclofen. This page lists a few possible symptoms of an overdose and explains what to do if you have taken too much of the drug. A link to more information is also included.
  • Cancer and Novantrone
    When used for the treatment of certain types of cancer, Novantrone works by damaging DNA. This eMedTV page explores this drug in more detail, including specific uses, and offers a link to a full-length article on this topic.
  • Capaxone
    Copaxone is a multiple sclerosis medication that is available by prescription only. This eMedTV page describes Copaxone in more detail, explores its effects, and lists possible side effects of the drug. Capaxone is a common misspelling of Copaxone.
  • Causes of Multiple Sclerosis
    As this eMedTV page explains, the cause of multiple sclerosis (MS) may be linked to the autoimmune process, environmental factors, or genetics. This article talks about how each of these may increase a person's risk of (MS).
  • Co je roztrousená skleróza?
    Za normálních okolností Vás Vá? imunitní systém pomáhá chránit.
  • Co to jest stwardnienie rozsiane?
    Organizm zdrowego cz?owieka jest chroniony przez uk?ad odporno?ciowy, czyli immunologiczny.
  • Copaxin
    Copaxone is a medication that can be prescribed to treat certain types of multiple sclerosis. This page on the eMedTV site explains how Copaxone works and describes its effects and possible side effects. Copaxin is a common misspelling of Copaxone.
  • Copaxine
    Copaxone is a prescription drug that is commonly used for treating some forms of multiple sclerosis. This eMedTV article describes this medication in more detail and explains its effects. Copaxine is a common misspelling of Copaxone.
  • Copaxon
    Copaxone is a prescription medication licensed for treating multiple sclerosis. This eMedTV article briefly describes the effects of Copaxone and provides a link to more detailed information. Copaxon is a common misspelling of Copaxone.
  • Copaxone
    Copaxone is a prescription multiple sclerosis medication. This article from the eMedTV Web site describes the effects of Copaxone, lists possible side effects that may occur with treatment, and offers dosing information for the drug.
  • Copaxone and Breastfeeding
    It is suggested that breastfeeding women use caution while taking Copaxone (glatiramer acetate). As this eMedTV page explains, it is unknown if the drug passes through breast milk because no studies have been conducted on Copaxone and breastfeeding.
  • Copaxone and Pregnancy
    The risk of using Copaxone (glatiramer acetate) during pregnancy is unknown, but the drug is probably safe. This eMedTV article offers more information on Copaxone and pregnancy, and explains what happened when the drug was given to pregnant animals.
  • Copaxone Dosage
    As you'll see in this eMedTV resource, there are two different dosing regimens for Copaxone. This article briefly explains how to administer Copaxone injections and offers tips on where on your body you should inject the medication.
  • Copaxone Drug Interactions
    There are no known Copaxone drug interactions at this time. As this eMedTV segment explains, new drug interactions may be discovered at any time, however, so be sure to talk to your doctor before starting any medicines during Copaxone treatment.
  • Copaxone Injection Information
    Are you looking for information on Copaxone? This eMedTV Web page offers some basic information on this MS drug, explaining how it is injected and why Copaxone cannot be taken by mouth. Also included is a link to more details on this injection.
  • Copaxone Overdose
    It is not known what to expect from a Copaxone (glatiramer acetate) overdose. This eMedTV resource explains why a Copaxone overdose that is taken by mouth is unlikely to cause problems and describes overdose treatment options that are available.
  • Copaxone Side Effects
    The most common side effects of Copaxone are injection site reactions, like pain, itching, or redness. This eMedTV page lists other possible side effects, including common problems, rare problems, and serious side effects that require medical attention.
  • Copaxone Uses
    Copaxone is used for treating relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis in people over the age of 18. This eMedTV Web page explains how the medication may work to treat multiple sclerosis and explores possible off-label Copaxone uses.
  • Copaxone Warnings and Precautions
    Copaxone should not be injected into a vein or muscle. This page from the eMedTV archives provides a list of other Copaxone warnings and precautions, and describes certain side effects you should look out for while taking the medication.
  • Crohn's Disease and Tysabri
    If you have Crohn's disease, you may benefit from a drug called Tysabri. This eMedTV segment takes a brief look at who this medicine is approved for and lists some of the symptoms it can help treat. A link to more information is also included.
  • Current Treatments for Multiple Sclerosis
    Various treatments for multiple sclerosis are available, which this video describes.
  • Dantrium
    Available by prescription, Dantrium is a drug licensed to treat muscle spasticity due to certain conditions. This eMedTV article presents a description of important features of this medicine, including how it works, how it is used, side effects, and more.
  • Dantrium 100 Mg Capsules
    As this eMedTV page explains, taking 100 mg of Dantrium three or four times a day may help treat muscle spasticity or a rare condition called malignant hyperthermia. This resource describes uses of this drug, various forms, and general dosing information.
  • Dantrium 25 Mg Capsules
    As this eMedTV page explains, a doctor may prescribe 25-mg Dantrium capsules to treat muscle spasticity caused by certain neurological conditions. This article takes a brief look at some dosing guidelines for this drug and offers a link to more details.
  • Dantrium and Breastfeeding
    As this eMedTV page explains, women are generally advised to not use Dantrium (dantrolene) while breastfeeding. This article explores this topic, including details on whether the drug passes through breast milk and why it may be best to avoid it.
  • Dantrium and Pregnancy
    Is it safe for women to use Dantrium (dantrolene) during pregnancy? This page of the eMedTV Web library discusses what happened when the drug was given to pregnant animals and explains when this medicine may be prescribed to a pregnant woman.
  • Dantrium Dosage
    A person's Dantrium dose is highly individualized, based on which product they are using and other factors. This eMedTV page explains how your dosage is determined and describes some of the factors that may affect your specific amount.
  • Dantrium Drug Interactions
    As explained in this eMedTV Web selection, Dantrium can cause negative drug interactions with various products, including alcohol, antidepressants, and estrogen. This article describes the complications that may occur and how to avoid problems.
  • Dantrium Intravenous 20 Mg
    This eMedTV page explains that if you have a rare condition called malignant hyperthermia, your doctor may prescribe 20 mg of Dantrium given intravenously. This page explores what this drug is used for and how it is given. It also links to more details.
  • Dantrium Medication Information
    This eMedTV resource features information on Dantrium, a prescription medication used for the treatment of certain muscle problems. This resource explores safety precautions, dosing instructions, and specific uses. It also links to more details.
  • Dantrium Overdose
    This eMedTV page contains details on the potentially serious problems that can result from an overdose of Dantrium (dantrolene), such as confusion and a fast heart rate. Other overdose symptoms are listed, as well as possible treatment options.
  • Dantrium Side Effects
    People using Dantrium may develop side effects, such as fatigue, dizziness, and general ill feelings. This eMedTV page takes an in-depth look at some of the commonly reported reactions to this drug, as well as serious complications that may also occur.
  • Dantrium Uses
    This eMedTV resource discusses how Dantrium works to treat muscle spasticity and malignant hyperthermia. This article closely examines what Dantrium is used for, whether it is safe for use in children, and when it may be prescribed for unapproved reasons.
  • Dantrium Warnings and Precautions
    This eMedTV page explores who may have an increased risk for complications during Dantrium treatment. Important warnings and safety precautions for this drug are described in this article, including what to tell your doctor before using it.
  • Das Nervensystem
    Der Körper besteht aus einem grossen Netzwerk von Nerven, das die elektrischen Signale zum und vom Gehirn weiterleitet.
  • De diagnose multipele sclerose stellen
    Er bestaat geen specifieke medische test voor het vaststellen van multipele sclerose.
  • De huidige behandelingsmethoden voor multipele sclerose
    Er is geen genezende therapie voor multipele sclerose bekend, maar er zijn vele behandelingsmethoden.
  • Derzeit verfügbare Therapien gegen Multiple Sklerose
    Multiple Sklerose ist zwar nicht heilbar, aber es gibt viele Möglichkeiten, die Krankheit zu therapieren.
  • Diagnose der Multiplen Sklerose
    Es gibt keinen spezifischen Test für die Diagnose der MS. Vielmehr müssen die Zeichen und Symptome des Erkrankten bestimmte Kriterien erfüllen.
  • Diagnosing MS
    Since most people don't recognize the early symptoms of MS, making a diagnosis may be difficult. This eMedTV resource provides a detailed description of the tests used in diagnosing multiple sclerosis, such as blood tests, MRI, and spinal tap.
  • Diagnosing Multiple Sclerosis
    Certain tests can help diagnose multiple sclerosis, as this video clip explains.
  • Diagnostika roztrousené sklerózy
    Neexistují ?ádné specifické testy ur?ené k diagnóze sklerózy.
  • Diagnostisering av multipel skleros
    Det finns inget specifikt test för att diagnostisera multipel skleros.
  • Drug Interactions With Tizanidine
    Zyflo, Cipro, and Tagamet are some of the medications that can cause tizanidine drug interactions. This eMedTV Web page offers more information on these and other potential interactions, including the problems that can occur as a result.
  • Early Symptoms of MS
    Common early symptoms of MS include vague feelings of weakness, clumsiness, or exhaustion. This segment of the eMedTV library covers early signs and symptoms of the disease, including information on specific symptoms such as optic neuritis.
  • Early Symptoms of Multiple Sclerosis
    As this eMedTV page explains, the type of early symptoms of multiple sclerosis one experiences depends on the parts of the central nervous system that are affected. This page lists early signs and symptoms of the condition, such as muscle weakness.
  • Extavia
    The prescription drug Extavia is used as a treatment for multiple sclerosis (MS). This eMedTV Web page explores how this medicine may work for MS, explains when and how to take it, lists some of its potential side effects, and more.
  • Extavia and Breastfeeding
    Women are generally advised to avoid breastfeeding while using Extavia (interferon beta-1b). This eMedTV Web page explains whether the medication passes through breast milk and, if it does, whether it is likely to cause problems in a nursing infant.
  • Extavia and Depression
    Some people taking Extavia may experience depression during treatment. As this eMedTV page explains, it can be hard to tell if the depression is caused by the medication. This article also describes the results of clinical studies on side effects.
  • Extavia and Pregnancy
    Based on the results of animal studies, it is unclear whether pregnant women should take Extavia. This eMedTV page explains what problems occurred when the drug was given to pregnant monkeys and explores the risks of using Extavia in pregnant women.
  • Extavia Dosage
    As this eMedTV page explains, people typically start with a low dose of Extavia (such as 0.25 mL) and slowly work up to the full 1-mL dosage. This article offers more information on when and how to take this multiple sclerosis medicine.
  • Extavia Interactions
    Theophylline products and zidovudine may cause drug interactions with Extavia. This article from the eMedTV library lists specific products from these drug classes and explains what problems may occur if they are taken with Extavia.
  • Extavia Medication Information
    If you are an adult with multiple sclerosis (MS), you may benefit from a drug called Extavia. This eMedTV Web article gives an overview of this medication, with information on dosing, side effects, and more. A link to more details is also included.
  • Extavia Overdose
    As this eMedTV segment explains, an overdose of Extavia (interferon beta-1b) is not likely to cause serious problems, but still requires medical care. This article takes a closer look at what could happen when people take too much Extavia.
  • Extavia Side Effects
    Potential Extavia side effects include muscle pain, weakness, and flu-like symptoms. This eMedTV Web page lists other possible side effects, including common problems and rare but potentially serious problems that require immediate medical attention.
  • Extavia Uses
    Extavia is a prescription drug that helps to treat multiple sclerosis (known commonly as MS). This page on the eMedTV Web site describes the benefits of this medicine, explains how it works, and also discusses possible off-label Extavia uses.
  • Extavia Warnings and Precautions
    If you have thyroid problems, talk to your doctor before using Extavia. This eMedTV segment explains what else to tell your doctor about before taking Extavia. Warnings and precautions on what side effects may occur with the drug are also listed.
  • Generic Ampyra
    As this eMedTV article explains, there are no generic Ampyra (dalfampridine) products available at this time. This page discusses why there are currently no generic versions of this medication and explains when a generic might become available.
  • Generic Aubagio
    You cannot buy a generic Aubagio (teriflunomide) product at this time. This part of the eMedTV library discusses why this is the case and explores whether a generic will become available in the future.
  • Generic Avonex
    At this time, it is not known whether generic Avonex products will ever be available. As this eMedTV segment explains, Avonex is a "biologic" medicine that is under certain laws that prevent any generic versions of the drug from being manufactured.
  • Generic Baclofen
    Baclofen (Lioresal, Gablofen) tablets and intrathecal injection are currently available in generic form. This eMedTV page takes a closer look at this topic, with details on the available strengths of the generic versions.
  • Generic Betaseron
    Betaseron (interferon beta-1b) is not available as a generic. As this eMedTV page explains, Betaseron is a "biologic" drug that is not allowed to be made in generic form. If laws for biologics change in the future, generic Betaseron may be available.
  • Generic Copaxone
    Copaxone (glatiramer acetate) is not yet available in generic form. This eMedTV article explains when generic Copaxone products may be available and explores the dangers of buying generic drugs that are not licensed and approved in this country.
  • Generic Dantrium
    As this eMedTV page explains, generic Dantrium (dantrolene) is available in the form of capsules or an injection. This article lists the available strengths of these products and discusses whether they are as good as the brand-name medication.
  • Generic Extavia
    Certain laws prevent generic Extavia (interferon beta-1b) from being manufactured. This segment of the eMedTV archives explains why Extavia is under these laws and regulations, and explains whether these laws are expected to change in the future.
  • Generic Gilenya
    This selection from the eMedTV Web library discusses why there are currently no generic Gilenya (fingolimod) products available. This article explains when a generic might become available and why fingolimod is not the same as a generic version.
  • Generic Name for Dantrium
    You can buy generic Dantrium, which is sold under the name dantrolene. This eMedTV Web selection describes the differences between the brand-name and generic products and how they are given. A link to more information is also included.
  • Generic Novantrone
    As this eMedTV page explains, you can only buy generic Novantrone (mitoxantrone) products, as the brand-name version of the drug is no longer made. This article explores these generics, including details on whether they are as good as the brand-name drug.
  • Generic Rebif
    There are currently laws that prevent generic Rebif (interferon beta-1a) from being manufactured. This eMedTV page explains why generic Rebif products are not allowed to be made at this time and explores whether these laws will change in the future.
  • Generic Tecfidera
    As this eMedTV page explains, exclusivity rights are currently in place that prevent a generic Tecfidera (dimethyl fumarate) from being made at this time. However, a generic version of the drug may become available after the rights expire in March 2018.
  • Generic Tysabri
    As with other "biologic" medications, Tysabri (natalizumab) cannot yet be manufactured in generic form. This eMedTV segment discusses the laws that apply to biologic drugs and explains when generic Tysabri products could be made.
  • Gilenya
    Gilenya is a prescription medicine used to treat multiple sclerosis (MS). This eMedTV Web selection provides a complete overview of this medication, with information on how it works, possible side effects, dosing guidelines, and safety precautions.
  • Gilenya and Breastfeeding
    This eMedTV page explains why the risks of taking Gilenya (fingolimod) while breastfeeding are unknown. This page also discusses whether the drug passes through breast milk and offers information on what to discuss with your doctor before taking Gilenya.
  • Gilenya and Pregnancy
    This eMedTV article explains why it may not be safe to take Gilenya (fingolimod) during pregnancy. This article also takes an in-depth look at some of the potential problems this drug can cause in pregnant women, such as miscarriages and birth defects.
  • Gilenya Side Effects
    Although usually well tolerated, Gilenya can cause side effects like headaches, diarrhea, and back pain. This eMedTV article offers an in-depth list of potential side effects that may occur with this prescription medicine, including serious problems.
  • How Does Baclofen Work?
    As this eMedTV Web resource explains, baclofen may work to treat spasticity by inhibiting certain nerve signals in the body. This page further discusses how baclofen is believed to work, including information on its possible effects in the body.
  • How Does BG-12 Work?
    Tecfidera is a medicine prescribed to treat relapsing forms of multiple sclerosis. This part of the eMedTV Web site explores how this medicine, formerly known as BG-12, works. It also provides a link to more detailed information on the drug.
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